¡Watcha mi tachuce! The Bonaroo Look

¡Watcha mi tachuce! The Bonaroo Look

By Research.Pomona.edu – Photo Not Credited. To look Bonaroo was to look cool. In Los Angeles during the 1930s and 1940s, zoot suits were mostly worn by poor and working class Mexican, African American and Jewish youth. These tailored outfits had broad shoulders...
La Pachuca: Mexican subculture in 1940’s L.A.

La Pachuca: Mexican subculture in 1940’s L.A.

By Maria Rios – MuseumOfTheCity.org – Photo Tumblr Pachuca girls in a police station, 1940s The pachuca/os culture came into the spotlight in the summer of 1942 with the death of José Díaz on Williams ranch in rural Los Angeles, located near reservoirs...
The Zoot Suits, 1940s

The Zoot Suits, 1940s

By Kathleen Campos-Banales – mtholyoke.edu – Photo Meier & Rivera 145 During World War II, a lot of youths were expressing themselves through their outfits such as the zoot suits. Zoot suits “consisted of a broad-rimmed, flat hat; a long draped coat;...
Tattoo Artist to the Stars

Tattoo Artist to the Stars

By Annette Semerdjian – ThePrideLA.com – Photo Not Credited Mark Machado a.k.a. Mister Cartoon grew up in the Los Angeles Harbor Region. His Mexican-American heritage influences much of his fine line black and gray work. His designs have roots in graffiti...
Zoot Suit Discovery Guide

Zoot Suit Discovery Guide

By Research.Pomona.edu – Image Not Credited Pachuco and Pachuca are terms coined in the 1940s to refer to Mexican American men and women who dressed in zoot suits or zoot suit-influenced attire. Though there is no definite origin of the word Pachuco, one theory...